Chimichanga
Chimichanga
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nevver:

Where’s you head at? Valentin Leonida
nevver:

Where’s you head at? Valentin Leonida
nevver:

Where’s you head at? Valentin Leonida
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1337tattoos:

WATSON ATKINSON
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nevver:

Foresta Lumina
nevver:

Foresta Lumina
nevver:

Foresta Lumina
nevver:

Foresta Lumina
nevver:

Foresta Lumina
nevver:

Foresta Lumina
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nevver:

Marcel Duchamp
+
the-gasoline-station:

Stumblers, Istanbul, 2014
by Erdal Inci
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staceythinx:

Selections from Tallmadge Doyle’s ethereal Celestial Mapping Series
staceythinx:

Selections from Tallmadge Doyle’s ethereal Celestial Mapping Series
staceythinx:

Selections from Tallmadge Doyle’s ethereal Celestial Mapping Series
staceythinx:

Selections from Tallmadge Doyle’s ethereal Celestial Mapping Series
staceythinx:

Selections from Tallmadge Doyle’s ethereal Celestial Mapping Series
staceythinx:

Selections from Tallmadge Doyle’s ethereal Celestial Mapping Series
staceythinx:

Selections from Tallmadge Doyle’s ethereal Celestial Mapping Series
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+
nevver:

Back to work
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retrogasm:

Robert McGinnis
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nevver:

Calvin and Hobbes
+
wingofablueroller:

Terunobu Fujimori – Takasugi-an (2004)
"Terunobu Fujimori is perhaps one of the more academic architects working in Japan today, both conceptually and in practice. He has been deeply influenced by the tea house, which makes him a perfect subject as we wind down our discussion. In 2004 Fujimori completed a tea house titled Takasugi-an (高過庵), literally “too tall hermitage.” Firmly footed in the teachings of Rikyu, the interior is anything but spacious and is composed of humble materials like plaster and bamboo mats. Although Rikyu preferred the even smaller 2-mat space for floor area, Fujimori went with the iconic yojohan (4.5 tatami mats); just enough space for 2 guests to sit (but not stand!) Here is where, visually, the similarities cease and Fujimori’s tea house diverges from tradition. The house was erected upon 2 trees that were cut and brought in from a nearby mountain. In order to reach the room, guests must climb up the freestanding ladders propped up against the tree. And therein lies the genius of Fujimori’s work. Using paradox to guide the consciousness of his guests, he takes them from an exhilarating climb to a serene and spiritual setting high above ground." Source: Spoon & Tamago
wingofablueroller:

Terunobu Fujimori – Takasugi-an (2004)
"Terunobu Fujimori is perhaps one of the more academic architects working in Japan today, both conceptually and in practice. He has been deeply influenced by the tea house, which makes him a perfect subject as we wind down our discussion. In 2004 Fujimori completed a tea house titled Takasugi-an (高過庵), literally “too tall hermitage.” Firmly footed in the teachings of Rikyu, the interior is anything but spacious and is composed of humble materials like plaster and bamboo mats. Although Rikyu preferred the even smaller 2-mat space for floor area, Fujimori went with the iconic yojohan (4.5 tatami mats); just enough space for 2 guests to sit (but not stand!) Here is where, visually, the similarities cease and Fujimori’s tea house diverges from tradition. The house was erected upon 2 trees that were cut and brought in from a nearby mountain. In order to reach the room, guests must climb up the freestanding ladders propped up against the tree. And therein lies the genius of Fujimori’s work. Using paradox to guide the consciousness of his guests, he takes them from an exhilarating climb to a serene and spiritual setting high above ground." Source: Spoon & Tamago
wingofablueroller:

Terunobu Fujimori – Takasugi-an (2004)
"Terunobu Fujimori is perhaps one of the more academic architects working in Japan today, both conceptually and in practice. He has been deeply influenced by the tea house, which makes him a perfect subject as we wind down our discussion. In 2004 Fujimori completed a tea house titled Takasugi-an (高過庵), literally “too tall hermitage.” Firmly footed in the teachings of Rikyu, the interior is anything but spacious and is composed of humble materials like plaster and bamboo mats. Although Rikyu preferred the even smaller 2-mat space for floor area, Fujimori went with the iconic yojohan (4.5 tatami mats); just enough space for 2 guests to sit (but not stand!) Here is where, visually, the similarities cease and Fujimori’s tea house diverges from tradition. The house was erected upon 2 trees that were cut and brought in from a nearby mountain. In order to reach the room, guests must climb up the freestanding ladders propped up against the tree. And therein lies the genius of Fujimori’s work. Using paradox to guide the consciousness of his guests, he takes them from an exhilarating climb to a serene and spiritual setting high above ground." Source: Spoon & Tamago
wingofablueroller:

Terunobu Fujimori – Takasugi-an (2004)
"Terunobu Fujimori is perhaps one of the more academic architects working in Japan today, both conceptually and in practice. He has been deeply influenced by the tea house, which makes him a perfect subject as we wind down our discussion. In 2004 Fujimori completed a tea house titled Takasugi-an (高過庵), literally “too tall hermitage.” Firmly footed in the teachings of Rikyu, the interior is anything but spacious and is composed of humble materials like plaster and bamboo mats. Although Rikyu preferred the even smaller 2-mat space for floor area, Fujimori went with the iconic yojohan (4.5 tatami mats); just enough space for 2 guests to sit (but not stand!) Here is where, visually, the similarities cease and Fujimori’s tea house diverges from tradition. The house was erected upon 2 trees that were cut and brought in from a nearby mountain. In order to reach the room, guests must climb up the freestanding ladders propped up against the tree. And therein lies the genius of Fujimori’s work. Using paradox to guide the consciousness of his guests, he takes them from an exhilarating climb to a serene and spiritual setting high above ground." Source: Spoon & Tamago
wingofablueroller:

Terunobu Fujimori – Takasugi-an (2004)
"Terunobu Fujimori is perhaps one of the more academic architects working in Japan today, both conceptually and in practice. He has been deeply influenced by the tea house, which makes him a perfect subject as we wind down our discussion. In 2004 Fujimori completed a tea house titled Takasugi-an (高過庵), literally “too tall hermitage.” Firmly footed in the teachings of Rikyu, the interior is anything but spacious and is composed of humble materials like plaster and bamboo mats. Although Rikyu preferred the even smaller 2-mat space for floor area, Fujimori went with the iconic yojohan (4.5 tatami mats); just enough space for 2 guests to sit (but not stand!) Here is where, visually, the similarities cease and Fujimori’s tea house diverges from tradition. The house was erected upon 2 trees that were cut and brought in from a nearby mountain. In order to reach the room, guests must climb up the freestanding ladders propped up against the tree. And therein lies the genius of Fujimori’s work. Using paradox to guide the consciousness of his guests, he takes them from an exhilarating climb to a serene and spiritual setting high above ground." Source: Spoon & Tamago
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michaelmoonsbookshop:

The Kiss of the oceans - postcard from 1923
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"But if these years have taught me anything it is this: you can never run away. Not ever. The only way out is in."
Junot Díaz (via likeafieldmouse)
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brazilwonders:

São Paulo, SP (by Renato Stockler)
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likeafieldmouse:

Rudy Cremonini - Amygdala (2012)
1. Time Recovered
2. Every Policy and Assignment
3. Interior
4. The Pact
5. Swimming Pool Party
6. The Escape
7. The Barber
8. Study of a Child
likeafieldmouse:

Rudy Cremonini - Amygdala (2012)
1. Time Recovered
2. Every Policy and Assignment
3. Interior
4. The Pact
5. Swimming Pool Party
6. The Escape
7. The Barber
8. Study of a Child
likeafieldmouse:

Rudy Cremonini - Amygdala (2012)
1. Time Recovered
2. Every Policy and Assignment
3. Interior
4. The Pact
5. Swimming Pool Party
6. The Escape
7. The Barber
8. Study of a Child
likeafieldmouse:

Rudy Cremonini - Amygdala (2012)
1. Time Recovered
2. Every Policy and Assignment
3. Interior
4. The Pact
5. Swimming Pool Party
6. The Escape
7. The Barber
8. Study of a Child
likeafieldmouse:

Rudy Cremonini - Amygdala (2012)
1. Time Recovered
2. Every Policy and Assignment
3. Interior
4. The Pact
5. Swimming Pool Party
6. The Escape
7. The Barber
8. Study of a Child
likeafieldmouse:

Rudy Cremonini - Amygdala (2012)
1. Time Recovered
2. Every Policy and Assignment
3. Interior
4. The Pact
5. Swimming Pool Party
6. The Escape
7. The Barber
8. Study of a Child
likeafieldmouse:

Rudy Cremonini - Amygdala (2012)
1. Time Recovered
2. Every Policy and Assignment
3. Interior
4. The Pact
5. Swimming Pool Party
6. The Escape
7. The Barber
8. Study of a Child
likeafieldmouse:

Rudy Cremonini - Amygdala (2012)
1. Time Recovered
2. Every Policy and Assignment
3. Interior
4. The Pact
5. Swimming Pool Party
6. The Escape
7. The Barber
8. Study of a Child
likeafieldmouse:

Rudy Cremonini - Amygdala (2012)
1. Time Recovered
2. Every Policy and Assignment
3. Interior
4. The Pact
5. Swimming Pool Party
6. The Escape
7. The Barber
8. Study of a Child